14.3.16

#2016ClassicsChallenge, The Jungle Book.


This month's classic took a little longer than expected, considering I started it mid-January and have only just finished. The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling was NOT what I'd expected, having grown up with the Disney film. 
WHEN I Discovered This Classic
I kind of think classics aren't classics unless you have known of them for forever, The Jungle Book is a key example. 

WHY I Chose to Read It 
I thought it would be different to anything I was reading, and boy was it different to anything I'd ever read! 

WHAT Makes It A Classic
The Jungle Book (1894) is a collection of stories by English author Rudyard Kipling. The stories were first published in magazines in 1893–94. Kipling was born in India and spent the first six years of his childhood there. After about ten years in England, he went back to India and worked there for about six-and-a-half years. These stories were written when Kipling lived in Vermont.
The tales in the bookare fables, using animals in an anthropomorphic manner to give moral lessons. The verses of The Law of the Jungle, for example, lay down rules for the safety of individuals, families, and communities. Kipling put in them nearly everything he knew or "heard or dreamed about the Indian jungle." The best-known of them are the three stories revolving around the adventures of Mowgli, an abandoned "man cub" who is raised by wolves in the Indian jungle. The most famous of the other four stories are probably "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi", the story of a heroic mongoose, and "Toomai of the Elephants", the tale of a young elephant-handler. As with much of Kipling's work, each of the stories is followed by a piece of verse. (Source)

WHAT I Thought of This Classic
I am not sure what I think of this book. I gave it two stars on Goodreads, mostly because I found it really difficult to understand. Each chapter is quite long (30+ pages on my iPhone) and the language is very old fashioned, by the end I was just willing for it to finish. I did persevere, though I did skim-read the last chapter, but man that was a lot of words. I guess that's fables for you, though. 

WILL It Stay A Classic & WHO I’d Recommend It To
Quite probably, though I'm not really sure I understand why. I don't know who I would recommend it to either, it must have a very specific audience.

The Railway Children, by E. Nesbit is next on my list of classics, which I'm sure I have read before but I cannot remember it, so that should be interesting. What classics are you reading?

Bee.



13.3.16

February.

Untitled
Untitled
Untitled
Untitled
Untitled
Untitled
Untitled
Untitled

I wonder, really, whether I'll ever get back to blogging things when they actually happen. Nearly half-way through March and it feels like someone pressed the fast-forward button at Christmas. Fingers crossed for some good weather, a little inspiration and a lot of motivation! Natural light always makes for better pictures, which means more blogging and writing. I keep promising I'll get my paints back out too, especially as I bought brand new watercolours following a painting class last year. All I need are a few extra hours in the day! Indoor softball season is in full swing, I have my pom-poms ready and a new-found excitement for exercise (though it is tempting to lie down until that feeling passes!). We're back in the swing of school and uni, swimming and reading. Life is good.

Bee.

12.3.16

Stick Man Adventure Trail.

Untitled
Untitled
Untitled
Untitled
Untitled
Untitled
Untitled
Untitled
Untitled
Untitled
Untitled

Untitled

Last year (woah, was it really that long ago?!) we visited the Alice Holt Forest in Hampshire to find the Gruffalo. A few weeks ago, we went back again, this time to follow the Stick Man Trail. The trails are dotted with animal signs, which the boys loved spotting, and activities. It was retty wet and muddy when we went, so we chose not to do a few but the boys had great fun splashing in the puddles and squelching through the mud while reciting the story. We played in the dens, some of them were pretty impressive. made nests out of sticks and listened for the birds. We even found a friendly robin, who seemed to follow us along the trail. Once we'd found the Stick Man, which was hilarious because he blended so well with the trees the boys walked straight past him, we had lunch on the picnic benches and drank coffee while the boys played in the adventure playground. Joshua was begging to go to the park as soon as we started the trail! It was a fun, free afternoon, making one of the boys' favourite books come alive!

Bee.

9.3.16

Danielisms.

Untitled
Untitled

Conversations with my five year old.

Me: Boys, can you stay down here and play nicely while I make a quick phone call, please?
Daniel: What are you doing?
Me: I'm making I phone call. I did ask...
Daniel: Sorry, can you be quiet just a second, I'm on the phone. (*raises a Bob the Builder phone to his ear and has a conversation in to it)

Daniel: Did you know the space rocket that Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong flew to the moon was larger than the tallest building in America?
Me: Do you know what that building is?
Daniel: Oh, I did but I forgot.
*Half an hour later*
Daniel: Did you know the space rocket that Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong flew to the moon was larger than the tallest building in America?
Me: Do you know what that building is?
Daniel: Oh, I did remember it just then but I forgot.
*This continued for about three days.*

D: I love you so much. Guess what I love the most in the whole world?
M: Me!
D: No. I do like you quite a lot, but I love someone else more... You're in the top three, but you're third. *pause* Actually, I love cheetahs a tiny bit less that I love you, and I love space the same as you. So I do love you the most. And space.

D: Who is our father?
M: Daddy is your father.
D: But he's our Daddy.
M: Yes, it means the same thing, like Mummy and Mother.
D: Like a man?
M: Sort of.
D: Like men then?
M: Men is the plural of man.
D: Like X-Men?!